Does the Cube i7 stylus support a linux system OS like ubuntu?

Does the Cube i7 stylus support a linux system OS like ubuntu?

TechTablets Forums Cube Forums i7 Core M / i7 Stylus Discussion Does the Cube i7 stylus support a linux system OS like ubuntu?

Viewing 14 posts - 16 through 29 (of 29 total)
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  • #29618
    Elio Sarotto
    Participant
    • Posts: 6

    Could someone post a video to show how it looks like with ubuntu on board?

    Thank you 🙂

    #30488
    luis
    Participant
    • Posts: 1

    Hi all,

    could someone give me an idea about performance? I plan to use it to general programming, running RStudio for statistical analysis and writing down notes during lectures. Will it be able to run Ubuntu with an acceptable performance?

    Thanks,

    Luis

    #34939
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Posts: 41

    XJUbunTAB now supports WiFi & Bluetooth chipset from Realtek 8723BS

    http://xjubuntab.xjesus.net

    #43058
    Jo Fi
    Participant
    • Posts: 1

    Hello,

    I got Ubuntu working as live environment, also the WiFi, so everything is just fine. However, when I intsalled it to the hdd, it is not recognized by the bios, I can also not manually choose the interal disk from the boot options list?! What am I doing wrong? I used the delete disc and install option….

     

    cheers, Johannes

    #43139
    BBaker
    Participant
    • Posts: 283

    Hello, I got Ubuntu working as live environment, also the WiFi, so everything is just fine. However, when I intsalled it to the hdd, it is not recognized by the bios, I can also not manually choose the interal disk from the boot options list?! What am I doing wrong? I used the delete disc and install option…. cheers, Johannes

     Try posting this question to Cube i7 XDA-developers forum and/or the Ubuntu forum.

    #44918
    BBaker
    Participant
    • Posts: 283

    @Jesus, and others, I missed this but Chris did a quick live-USB test of the Core i7 with Linux Mint Cinnamon 18 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd1Dga10YBo

    Just a USB bootup test, not installed.

    #44919
    BBaker
    Participant
    • Posts: 283

    @jo_fi, I saw on the XDA-dev site that there is updated BIOS, is that what you need to do to get Ubuntu working on your HDD install?

    #47037
    tprata
    Participant
    • Posts: 1

    Have it running archlinux, only thing not tested is bluetooth, as I don’t need it. Touch, pen, all working, performance is great, much faster at everything than windows, a bit higher temps though. Didn’t really notice any significant hit to the battery life, considering that the brightness won’t go as low as in windows. For touch mode, gnome works ok after a bit of messing with it, scales ok for most uses. Xjournal as onenote replacement for quick notes, and it works for my use. Normally I have it with a keyboard and with i3wm, since it has a small screen space is at a premium. Onboard provides the on screen keyboard when needed, can login with the native gnome keyboard at boot. Only “issue” is that if it locks, you need to click “login with different user” so that it opens the keyboard again to login with the same user. Had to do some messing with configs to keep wifi stable, but other than that it’s my daily driver as a laptop replacement. Any question feel free to ask

    #47051
    Bob
    Participant
    • Posts: 9

    Hello All..

    First post here..

    I’ve managed to get Linx tablets booting Linux Mint from SD card (the card slot is not recognized by the firmware as “bootable”). I see no reason why the same procedure cannot be used here.

    My cube is waiting a battery replacement (arrived today). I’m a bit swamped with DIY at the mo, so it will take a couple of days before I can test it.

    Essentially, the first stage boot is from the tablet’s EFI partition, the kernel and initrd are copied here. The grub config points to the SD card which “becomes available” i.e. recognised at this stage of booting. Control is passed to the kernel on the SD card in the latter stages of booting. Login and GUI procedures are then started as normal.

    If it works on the cube and anyone is interested, then I’ll provide a writeup.

    B.

    #47052
    Bob
    Participant
    • Posts: 9

    Forgot to say..

    You can also directly boot the Linux Mint ISO from anything that can connect to the tablet. Even from a NTFS partition…

    B.

    #47068
    Hypo Turtle
    Participant
    • Posts: 1

    Can I take it you have compiled mmc/sdcard drivers into the grub.efi?

     

    If not I don’t think this will work on the cube.

    #47069
    Bob
    Participant
    • Posts: 9

    Hi,

    Nope, but I understand why you ask…

    The following is taken from one of my posts on another forum..

    Earlier posts covered both direct ISO boot as well as booting/installing 64bit Linux on a 32bit UEFI tablet (normally Bay Trail powered). I then describe the installation procedure (for non-Linux people).

    At this stage, a normal installation is performed to the SD card.

    Extract:

    For reasons that will be explained shortly, the default installation to SD card cannot boot. It also very probably cannot initially be used on another tablet.

    The biggest reason that the default installation will fail to boot is this.
    When the tablet is powered on, it is initially not aware of and cannot “see” the SD card slot. i.e. the SD slot hardware is not fully (or at all) initialised by the firmware.

    The card slot only becomes “available” when the OS is running.

    Booting Linux from the flashdrive results in running system that can easily interact with the SD card slot. The installer detects that a card is inserted into the card slot and can perform a full installation to it. All well and good so far..

    But..

    If the SD card cannot be seen until the OS is running.. and the OS is installed onto the (so far, “invisible”) SD card, how does the system boot??
    The other problem is that the installer has placed all of the boot files to the tablet’s EFI partition and **not** to the EFI partition on the SD card. This would disallow the use of the SD card on another tablet…

    The answer to both of these is fairly obvious once you understand the basics of the Linux boot mechanism.

    The bootloader (Grub) starts the Linux kernel. This uses a temporary filesystem that is set up in memory (the initrd). This filesystem contains a very small set of drivers that the kernel uses to begin to start the real system. When the startup process has reached a certain point, control is passed to software on the real filesystem and the memory used by initial ram disk is freed. The graphical user interface (desktop) is then started. The user is then free to login.

    In the example of a SD card installation, we know that the SD card slot will become available to the system shortly after the initial boot.
    We also know how it will be identified by the system **when it is available**. The solution to the initial boot problem is to copy the kernel and initrd to the primary EFI partition. The Grub configuration file is simply altered to point to the these files in this location.
    The system is now fully bootable when everything is configured in this way.

    Extract end.

    Grub files (config & .mod files) are also placed in the tablet’s EFI partition

    I just use a simple grub.cfg . Example follows:

    menuentry ‘Initial boot, update me’ {
    insmod normal
    insmod gzio
    insmod part_gpt
    insmod ext2
    set root=’hd1,gpt1′
    linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mmcblk1p2 ##Bay Trail kernel parameters removed as they are not required here.##
    initrd /initrd.img
    }

    This was written for a Linx 7, 8 or 10. These tablets have eMMC storage.

    The trick (assuming that the required SD card hardware support is in the initrd) is to start the boot from the primary EFI partition and then pass control to the kernel on the SD card.

    The full writeup gives all of the details… if anyone is interested..

    I discovered this purely by accident. I had been playing with direct ISO boot and installation on a Linx 8. At the drive selection section I noticed that the installer had identified a 64GB SD card that I had forgotten to remove. (At that time, kernel Bay Trail support was quite poor, I wasn’t even expecting the SD slot to be recognised).

    This, coupled with a lot of Windows folk complaining that the SD slot couldn’t be used for booting, led me to experiment.. (aka play)..

    I’ll test this on my Cube and report back.

    B.

    #67540
    Diamond
    Participant
    • Posts: 2

    Yup, everything works. Typing this on a Logitech K480 bluetooth keyboard.

    Does cube i7 stylus fits logitech k480?

    #76122
    FUCKTECHTABLET
    Participant
    • Posts: 176

    Does webcam work?


    FUCK FUCKTECHTABLET

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